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Vincent Paris has rapidly ascended to become one of the stars of the tiny Cornas appellation. Blessed with a collection of small parcel, old vine vineyards (some nearly 100 years of age) which he inherited from his grandfather, Vincent has turned out some of the most exciting wines in the region in the past decade. The praise for Paris’ wines is almost universal, drawing consistently top marks from the Wine Advocate, Wine Spectator and Stephen Tanzer’s International Wine Cellar. His wines are also cited in the Cornas entry in Jancis Robinson encyclopedic tome The Oxford Companion to Wine (as one of a group of producers churning out a “luscious style of Cornas”) an honor reserved for only the absolute benchmark producers in a region.

Vincent Paris manages roughly 20-acres of vineyards to produce three Cornas wines: Granit 30, Granite 60, and Le Geynale. The Granite 30 comes from younger vines lower on the slope; the Granite 60 comes from slopes at higher elevation that are steeper planted with older vines. The Le Geynale is sourced from a 100 year old plot in the Renard lieu-dit. All of the wines see some stem inclusion during fermentation, which is done at low temperatures to preserve freshness and aroma. Maturation is done in a blend of cuve and barrique. The wines here offer an excellent opportunity to sample Syrah from a terroir that at its best can challenge the wines of Hermitage.


Reviews for this winery

  • Wine Advocate

    "An up and coming superstar of Cornas, Vincent Paris manages his roughly 20-acre estate to produce three Cornas; the Granit 30, which comes from younger vines located lower on the slope, in the lieu-dit Mazards; the Granite 60, which includes the older vines of the estate (and comes from steeper, higher elevation slopes); and the La Geynale, which comes from a single plot of 100-year-old vines located mostly in the Renard lieu-dit (it is also the only wine to not see any destemming). With regards to the Granit 30 and Granit 60, the number refers to the slope of the hill where the vines are planted, not the age of the vines."

    December 2013